Using niche marketing to make yourself standout.


Every agent is in a race. The race to be the best. However, if you do everything the same as everyone else, you will struggle to get ahead. You need to set yourself apart and make your services stand out. The best way to do this is by changing your tactics in the way you present yourself to the market, today we have some ideas that if implemented correctly, could give you the point of difference you have been looking for. 

Agents need to be honest with themselves when evaluating their marketing. If your marketing is not clearly bringing in leads, then there is a strong chance it isn't cutting through the clutter. If there are clients out there, and they aren't coming to you for your services, chances are you aren't presenting the right message to them. Therefore, your message needs to be succinct and unique to attract the right buyer. 

What is your micro-niche?

If you aren't getting a specific type of seller, chances are you aren't appealing to them. Start by making a profile of this seller:

  • How affluent are they?
  • What are their interests?
  • Who would they typically use?
  • What are the pain points they would experience with the service of another agent?

If your service isn't at least 10% better than the service they would typically use, chances are they wont convert to you. Therefore, target them and work on getting clients here. Once you can relate to a new prospect that you have sold every house for owners trying to get 1.5 Million + for a 3 bedroom home in their neighbourhood, their resistance will be minimal.

Niches to look out for:

You need to keep an eye out for specific niches that your services will appeal to. A vendor selling a three million dollar home, might be impressed you sold 100 homes last year, but if the average price was $300,000 they will be hesitant that you don't know anyone in their market, and chances are they are probably right. These niches could appeal to you as an agent.

Pet Lovers: There is nothing better than bonding over pets. Say you take your dog to a local park on a saturday morning and thirty other people are there with their dogs. Chances are, you can be certain they live locally, are very family orientated and quite compassionate. If you can provide information to them about homes that are pet friendly, and demonstrate how you live and breath their lifestyle, it will build up trust. 

Young families: Young families are identified by the fact that they generally have a changing home environment and need to upgrade constantly. Associating with these people are a great way to build up a consistent portfolio of clients. Chances are their friends live close and will be going through a similar stage. Going to local cafes, as well as family orientated areas is a good way to get your name out there. 

Singles: This is a huge niche. If you can explain to this market that you have helped a lot of people in this area set up their first home, you will have a lot of interest. This is one of the largest parts of the market, with people moving out of home and trying to buy their first place single a lot of the time. 

Retirees: As suburbs gentrify, lifestyles will change for these residents. Most likely, as people move towards this stage of life they will want to downsize. Therefore, targeting suburbs where there is an older demographic, and working with them to help transition in to a different lifestyle can be a good way to set yourself up as a niche agent. 

The best way to get started in a niche is to have a multi-pronged attack. Start by writing down the characteristics of all the owners of the current listings you have and have had in the past. Start to note the similar characteristics, no matter how obscure they are (even if the one thing in common is they love coffee!) From there, start to get involved in local events and discussions around these topics, and become an expert. If you can give them advice and be an expert on those topics, chances are they will also trust you when it comes to property knowledge as well. 

 

 

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